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Sam Bennett

Sam Bennett

12th of April 2023

7 MINS READ

GOOD CONTENT

Can You Wear a GoPro on Your Helmet in California?

In order to record their rides on video, cyclists and motorcyclists are using GoPro cameras more and more frequently. Yet, safety and legal issues have been brought up by the mounting of GoPro cameras on helmets. In California, helmet laws and traffic regulations must be followed. But is it legal to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California? Let’s find out.

Helmet Laws in California

Cycling and motorcycle helmet use are strictly prohibited in California. The California Vehicle Code mandates that all motorcycle riders and passengers wear helmets that adhere to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s safety requirements (DOT).

Bicyclists under the age of 18 are required to wear a helmet; bikers over 18 are permitted to ride without one.

Wear a GoPro on Your Helmet in California

California has strict helmet requirements, and breaking them might result in serious consequences. There are $10 to $250 in fines, and the infraction will show up on your driving record.

In the event of an accident, not wearing a helmet can further raise the chance of fatalities and head injuries.

California’s helmet regulations have some exceptions, such as when riding in a parade or taking part in specific kinds of racing competitions. However, mounting GoPro cameras on helmets is not permitted under these restrictions.

Use of GoPro on Helmets

Wear a GoPro on Your Helmet in California

Bicyclists and motorcyclists who want to record their rides frequently use GoPro cameras. These can be fixed to handlebars, helmets, or other bicycle or motorcycle components.

GoPros are excellent tools for recording journeys and events since they can take high-quality video and pictures.

The benefits of mounting a GoPro on a helmet include getting a distinctive viewpoint, capturing significant moments, and making a lasting record of your rides.

There are some drawbacks to take into account, though. For instance, attaching a GoPro to a helmet can be distracting and may compromise the safety of the helmet in an accident.

California’s helmet laws apply to the use of GoPro cameras on helmets. While it is legal to mount a GoPro on a helmet, it must not obstruct the rider’s view or violate any other traffic regulations.

The California Vehicle Code states that a person operating a bicycle or motorcycle must not wear a headset or earplugs in both ears. But they may wear a communication device in one ear.

It is important to note that the wear a GoPro on your helmet in California may be considered a distraction. Which could result in a citation or penalty.

Also, the structural integrity of the helmet should not be harmed by the GoPro’s location on it. GoPro cameras must be fitted safely and without interfering with the function or fit of the helmet.

Wear a GoPro on Your Helmet in California

A rider is not allowed to attach anything to the helmet that is not intended to be attached to it, according to the California Vehicle Code. Nevertheless, the code makes no mention of GoPro cameras or other like gadgets.

Hence, as long as the camera is firmly fixed and does compromise the helmet’s performance or fit, it is considered legal to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California.

In summary, while it is legal to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California, it is important to do so in a safe and responsible manner that does not violate any traffic laws or compromise your safety.

Be aware of the potential distractions and ensure that your GoPro does not obstruct your view or affect the performance of your helmet.

Tips for Using a GoPro on Your Helmet in California

If you plan to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California, here are some tips to help you do so safely and legally:


1. Follow Helmet Laws and Traffic Regulations

Verify that you are abiding by all traffic laws and helmet laws in California before placing a GoPro on your helmet. This include donning a DOT-approved helmet, avoiding using headphones in both ears, and avoiding any other distractions that can jeopardize your on the road safety.

2. Choose a Secure Mounting Location

When mounting your GoPro on your helmet, choose a location that is secure and will not compromise the structural integrity of the helmet. The camera should be mounted in a way that does not obstruct your view or interfere with the helmet’s performance in an accident.

3. Test the Mounting Before Riding

Before hitting the road, make sure to test the mounting of your GoPro to ensure that it is secure and will not come loose during your ride. Check the mounting periodically throughout your ride to make sure that the camera has not shifted or become loose.

4. Use Caution When Recording

Although it may be alluring to film every second of your ride, it’s crucial to exercise caution when using a GoPro mounted on your helmet. Avoid any acts that can divert your attention from the work at hand and keep your eyes on the road.

5. Review Your Footage After Your Ride

After your ride, take the time to review your footage and see what worked well and what didn’t. This will help you improve your technique and create better videos in the future.

Youtube Video About Wear A GoPro On Your Helmet in California

California Helmet Laws for Cyclists and Motorcyclists

Type of RiderAge RequirementHelmet Requirement
MotorcyclistsAll agesDOT-compliant helmet required
PassengersAll agesDOT-compliant helmet required
CyclistsUnder 18DOT-compliant helmet required
Cyclists18 and olderOptional

Final Thought

In conclusion, wearing a GoPro on your helmet in California is legal as long as you follow the state’s helmet laws and traffic regulations.

The usage of a GoPro on your helmet should not jeopardize your safety or break any regulations, even while it can be a useful tool for recording your rides and making a lasting record of your experiences.

You can legally and safely mount a GoPro on your helmet in California while documenting the thrill and adventure of your rides by following these rules and suggestions.

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FAQ

Is it legal to have a GoPro on my helmet?

Yes, as long as it does not restrict your vision or transgress any driving laws, it is acceptable to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California.

Is California a no helmet state?

California is not helmet-free. California’s helmet laws are severe. The California Vehicle Code requires motorcycle riders and passengers to wear DOT-approved helmets (DOT). 18-year-olds can ride without helmets, but under-18s must wear them.

What is California vehicle code 27803?

All motorcycle riders and passengers must comply with California Vehicle Code 27803 by donning a helmet that satisfies the U.S. Department of Transportation’s safety requirements (DOT).

Is camera not allowed on helmet?

Cameras on helmets are not particularly mentioned in the California Vehicle Code. A rider must not, however, fasten anything on the helmet that is not intended to be fastened to it. Hence, it is acceptable to wear a GoPro on your helmet in California as long as the camera is securely placed and does not affect the performance or fit of the helmet.

Can you wear a GoPro while riding a motorcycle?

In California, you are permitted to wear a GoPro while operating a motorcycle as long as it does not interfere with your vision or otherwise transgress any traffic laws. However, it’s crucial to exercise caution and make sure that mounting a GoPro on your helmet won’t jeopardize your safety or break any rules.

Can You Wear a GoPro on Your Helmet in California?